Where Is Cappadocia

Friday, February 25, 2005

Cappadocia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Cappadocia in 188 BC
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Cappadocia in 188 BC

In ancient geography, Cappadocia was an extensive inland district of Asia Minor (modern Turkey). In the time of Herodotus the Cappadocians occupied the whole region from Mount Taurus to the Euxine (Black Sea).

Cappadocia, in this sense, was bounded in the south by the chain of Mount Taurus, to the east by the Euphrates, north by Pontus, and west vaguely by the great central salt desert. But it is impossible to define its limits with accuracy. Strabo, the only ancient author who gives any circumstantial account of the country, greatly exaggerated its dimensions; it is now believed to have been about 250 miles in length by less than 150 in breadth.

Etymology

That author tells us that the name of the Cappadocians (Katpatouka) was applied to them by the Persians, while they were termed by the Greeks "Syrians" or "White Syrians" (Leucosyri). Historian Josephus claimed that these people were founded by the biblical figure Meshech, son of Japheth, "and the Mosocheni were founded by Mosoch; now they are Cappadocians." AotJ I:6. For more on Cappadocia and 'Meshech' see Ivane Javakhishvili. Under the later kings of the Persian empire they were divided into two satrapies or governments, the one comprising the central and inland portion, to which the name of Cappadocia continued to be applied by Greek geographers, while the other was called Pontus. This division had already come about before the time of Xenophon. As after the fall of the Persian government the two provinces continued to be separate, the distinction was perpetuated, and the name Cappadocia came to be restricted to the inland province (sometimes called Great Cappadocia), which alone will be considered in the present article.

The kingdom of Cappadocia was still in existence in the time of Strabo as a nominally independent state. Cilicia was the name given to the district in which Caesarea, the capital of the whole country, was situated. The only two cities of Cappadocia considered by Strabo to deserve that appellation were Caesarea (originally known as Mazaca) and Tyana, not far from the foot of the Taurus.

History

The unusual and scenic landscape of Cappadocia viewed from a hot-air balloon
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The unusual and scenic landscape of Cappadocia viewed from a hot-air balloon

Little is known of the history of Cappadocia before it became subject to the Persian empire, except that the country was the home of a great Hittite power centred at Hattusa (the modern village of Boguskoy in north-central Turkey), which has left monuments at many places. With the decline of the Syro-Cappadocians after their defeat by Croesus, Cappadocia was left in the power of a sort of feudal aristocracy, dwelling in strong castles and keeping the peasants in a servile condition, which later made them apt for foreign slavery. It was included in the third Persian satrapy in the division established by Darius, but long continued to be governed by rulers of its own, none apparently supreme over the whole country and all more or less tributary to the Great King. Thoroughly subdued at last by the satrap Datames, Cappadocia recovered independence under a single ruler, Ariarathes (hence called Ariarathes I), who was a contemporary of Alexander the Great, and maintained himself on the throne of Cappadocia after the fall of the Persian monarchy.

The province was not visited by Alexander, who contented himself with the tributary acknowledgment of his sovereignty made by Ariarathes before the conqueror's departure from Asia Minor; and the continuity of the native dynasty was only interrupted for a short time after Alexander's death, when the kingdom fell, in the general partition of the empire, to Eumenes. His claims were made good in 322 by the regent Perdiccas, who crucified Ariarathes; but in the dissensions following Eumenes's death, the son of Ariarathes recovered his inheritance and left it to a line of successors, who mostly bore the name of the founder of the dynasty.

Under the fourth of the name Cappadocia came into relations with Rome, first as a foe espousing the cause of Antiochus the Great, then as an ally against Perseus of Macedon. The kings henceforward threw in their lot with the Republic as against the Seleucids, to whom they had been from time to time tributary. Ariarathes V marched with the Roman proconsul Crassus against Aristonicus, a claimant to the throne of Pergamum, and their forces were annihilated (130 B.C.). The imbroglio which followed his death ultimately led to interference by the rising power of Pontus and the intrigues and wars which ended in the failure of the dynasty.

The Cappadocians, supported by Rome against Mithradates, elected a native lord, Ariobarzanes, to succeed (93 B.C.); but it was not till Rome had disposed at once of the Pontic and Armenian kings that his rule was established (63 B.C.). In the civil wars Cappadocia was now for Pompey, now for Caesar, now for Antony, now against him. The Ariobarzanes dynasty came to an end and a certain Archelaus reigned in its stead, by favour first of Antony, then of Octavian, and maintained tributary independence till A.D. 17, when the emperor Tiberius, on Archelaus's death in disgrace, reduced Cappadocia at last to a province.

Cappadocia contains several underground cities, largely used by early Christians as hiding places.

This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica.

Thursday, February 24, 2005

What to do in Cappadocia, Turkey?

From its perch at 1300 meters (4000 feet), Uçhisar dominates the Cappadocia valley and offers breathtaking views.

Climate is temperate with generally warm sunny days and nights that can be cool. If you plan on dining outside during the evening, don't forget a sweater!

Amenities, shopping, fruit and vegetable markets, and restaurants are available locally.

Primarily, you'll be able to enjoy one of the most beautiful sites on earth.

From your house you can take many hikes leading through the surrounding canyons and formations (good walking shoes recommended). The region around Uçhisar offers many fascinating destinations. There are underground cities, ancient cave-dwellings and cave-churches to visit. The old caravansaries that punctuate the 'Silk Road' shouldn't be missed.

After the day's activities, shopping for kilims, carpets, and local crafts is an agreable way to spend the time before dinner.

During your trip to Turkey, Cappadocia shoudn't be only another spot to visit. The area is so rich of well known and hidden places that we advise you to spend at least four days or better a week. Slow down and rest during your holidays!

discover!

  • The open air museum of G&oumlreme:
    A site of the christian history, essential to understand the area. Many extraordinary troglodytic churches featuring renowned wall painting iconography.

  • Hikes: Pigeon Valley, Red Valley, White Valley, Zelve... 2 to 3 hours of walk amist the fairy chimneys, the pigeon houses and moonlike landscapes...

  • The underground cities (Derinkuyu, Kaymakli...)

  • The old villages with famous greek architecture (Mustafapasa, Ibrahimpasa...)

  • Colorful open markets

  • Avanos: This world famous pottery center now sports a newly renovated Sari Han caravansary on the Silk Road.

  • Sultansazligi Natural Park (one day trip). Bird watching (300 species).

  • 4x4 or boat tours at the foot of the Erciyes volcano.

climb!
One hundred km to the South of Uçhisar are the magnificent Taurus mountains (3600m). Great hiking and climbing with professional guides in the most magnificent landscapes.

fly!
For a truly unforgettable couple of hours, you might consider going up in a hot-air balloon, piloted by experienced professionals. There is no better way to see Cappadocia

ride!
Discover Cappadocia in a different way. From Uçhisar you can ride off on horseback through the valleys and the fabulous landscapes of Cappadocia. What better way to meet the locals, the foxes and the forgotten villages.

swim!

  • Swimming pools available in Uçhisar during summer.
  • Turkish baths in Ürgüp (15 km from Uçhisar)
  • Spas of Bayramhaci

and last, but definitely not least!
Set your chaise longue on the panoramic terrace of your house, and spend a while doing nothing, or... read a good book, look at the sunset while sipping raki, go shopping, return back home to prepare your barbecue, have a tea with Faruk or Mustafa, bargain a kilim, play with the neighbor's cat, listen to the muezzin in the quietness of a summer evening.... and....

A WEEK IN CAPPADOCIA
Suggested itinerary

Now that we've cited a large list of things to do in Cappadocia, here's one of our preferred programs if you want to explore the region in seven days..

DAY 1: Transfert from the airport at Kayseri to Les Maisons de Cappadoce. Settle in.

DAY 2: Sleep in, enjoy a hearty breakfast on the terrace of your house, take in the view. Then, walking, discover the village of Uçhisar, and before sunset, climb the steps to the Citadel, where you can enjoy the sunset from the highest point in Cappadocia.

DAY 3: Accompanied by Mustapha, our guide, take a morning hike through the Valley of Pigeons. Then off to open-air museum of Goreme. After a late lunch, return to your house and relax in your garden or terrace.

DAY 4: Your rental car is delivered. Now you can visit the local markets, and in the afternoon, visit the sites of Cavusin, Zelve and Pasabag. Maybe pause and hike awhile in any of the grandiose fairy-rock landscapes that you'll pass through.

DAY 5: Early morning departure for the Valley of Soganli. Stop often en route to visit the Grecian villages of Mustafapasa, Cemil, Sahinefendi or any of the ancient churches and monestaries that you will discover along the way. There is a strong possibility that the local folk you meet will not let you leave before you've accepted a glass of tea, some dried apricots.

Lunch and walk in the Valley of Soganli (spectacular!), and on the way back, if you have the time, visit the underground city of Kaymakli.

DAY 6: Unless you decide to arise before dawn to take a warm-air balloon ride over Cappadocia, witness an amazing sunrise, today could just be a lazy day. Barbeque something on your terrace, negociate that kilim you had seen earlier at Faruk's or the pottery at Kerim's.

DAY 7: You haven't seen a tenth of what Cappadocia has to offer and you know you'll be back! Maybe the easiest way is to return to the Red Valley with Mustapha, follow him through the labyrinthe of hidden churches more than 2000 years old. Then climb up to the plateau and see your seventh Cappadocia sunset, one of the most beautiful you've ever seen.

Next time, you'll see the Green Valley, the Valley of Love, Ihlara Canyon, the ornithological park of Sultansazli. Probably find a day or two to trek the Taurus mountains, fish in the Kizilirmak, visit the potters of Avanos, a watch the whirling dervishes at the caravansérail de Sari Han.

CAPPADOCIA

CAVETOWNS AND GORGES OF CAPPADOCIA

For millions of years, the mighty volcanoes of the Central Anatolian Plateau erupted and spewed their contents across the land that would become the cradle of civilization. Blessed with a moderate climate and fertile soil, one of the world's earliest known communities was founded 10,000 years ago at Catalhoyuk along the river banks of the Casambasuyu near Konya. Mankind's first nature painting was found here and it portrays the most recent eruption of Hasan Dagi almost 9000 years ago. Today, its snow capped peaks dominate the Konya plain, awash in golden hues where vast wheat fields blend subtly with the ochre colored soil and the monochromatic palette is interrupted only where rivers flow and tall poplars flaunt their greenery.

Another great volcano rises in the distance to the east of Hasan Dagi. Once called Mt. Argeus, the awesome presence of Erciyes Dagi inspired legends as the "Abode of the Gods" and the Persians built a Zoroastrian fire temple nearby. These two ancient volcanoes mark the western and eastern boundaries of a region known for its curious volcanic landscape that has been relentlessly carved by nature and by the people who have lived here. 'Fairy chimneys,' cones and strange rock formations have been sculpted by wind and rain while subterranean towns were excavated by a populace seeking shelter from the conquerors and would-be conquerors who crisscrossed the wide open steppes of the Central Anatolian Plateau. Ancient Anatolian tribes, Assyrians, Hittites, Phrygians, Turkic tribes from Central Asia, Mongols, Persians, Syrians, Arabs, Kurds, Armenians, Slavs, Greeks, Romans and Western Europeans have all passed through leaving behind some of their traditions as well as their genes and rendering Cappadocians as exotic as their surreal surroundings.

Although the Hellenistic kingdom of Cappadocia once encompassed a much greater area, the name now refers to the region east of Konya that is defined by Aksaray to the west, Kayseri to the east, Nigde to the south and Kirsehir to the north. Guide books and tour buses focus on the underground cities of Kaymakli and Derinkuyu as well as the rock formations and Byzantine churches found within the triangular area bounded by Avanos, Nevsehir and Urgup. For those who take the time to explore the less traveled byways, Cappadocia is a land of discovery. Away from Goreme, Zelve and the major tourist sites, there are partially excavated Hittite centers, cavetowns and hundreds of churches that are rarely seen, gorges to explore and some of the most vivid, pastoral scenes to be captured in all of Turkey.

Aksaray is located on the Melendiz Cayi (Melendiz River) along the old trade route that connected Persia to the Aegean Sea. It was once the city of Garsaura that was later renamed Archelais but little of its ancient past survives. During the Seljuk era (1071-1300), Aksaray was transformed into an exemplary Muslim city where a hospital and schools were built. One of the first two Islamic theological schools, the Ibrahim Kadiroglu Medrese was built here in the 12th century. The other was built in Konya, one of Turkey's oldest continuously inhabited cities and the capital of the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum. These and later schools attracted some of the greatest Islamic scientists, philosophers and theologians of the age including Jelaluddin who escaped the Mongol invasion of Afghanistan. He is better known as Mevlana Jelaluddin Rumi, a renowned mystical Master and favorite saint of Konya.

The reign of Sultan Alaeddin Keykubat I (1219 - 1236) brought prosperity to the empire when he renovated the long neglected road system and constructed a series of hans (inns) along the way. Generally, they are massive fortress-like structures with impressive entrances framed by intricately carved honeycomb portals. Inside, a large courtyard with a central mescid (small mosque) is surrounded by arched porches where animals were tended. Another portal leads to the living quarters for travelers. Hans were located about a days distance apart by camel and they provided travelers with food, lodging, entertainment and protection. Twenty four miles to the west of Aksaray, the Sultanhan Caravanserai was the last overnight stop before reaching Konya. It was built about 1229 and has been partially restored. The Agzikarahan Caravanserai nine miles to the east of Aksaray retains its original features and is one of the best preserved in the area. This somnolent farming town now serves as a base for exploring the Ihlara Valley or as a rest stop on the way to Cappadocia but during the 13th century, it was an enclave of culture, refinement and scholarship that attracted visitors from all over the known world including the great Spanish scholar and mystic, Ibn El-Arabi.

A few miles past Aksaray, a good road leads to the main Nevsehir-Nigde highway by way of the Ihlara Valley and Guzelyurt. Rick Steves highlighted Guzelyurt in his Turkey travel video for television and now, even 'the pension where Rick Steves stayed' is offered as a place of interest for tourists! Guzelyurt is one of the most tourist friendly communities in Cappadocia with a multi-lingual aide who seems to materialize out of nowhere and whose job it is to assist visitors with practicalities like parking, food and lodging. Villagers and children will stop to chat and give directions to the 'antique city' of the old Greek quarter where the mosque was once an old Byzantine church that honored St. Gregory Nazianzus. He was born and died nearby and is prominent as one of the 4th century Cappadocian Fathers who defended the Nicene Creed against Arianism which denied the Divinity of Jesus Christ.

Formerly known as Karballa then Gelvere, Guzelyurt means 'beautiful land.' It is built on the cliffs surrounding a narrow gorge that is but a small appendage of the more impressive Ihlara Gorge. There are over fifty rock cut churches inside Monastery Valley which lays beyond the old village, past semi-troglodytic houses that line a narrow, winding road. People still live in these old cave dwellings and visitors are apt to see women baking bread in 400 year old communal ovens or children making mud pies on the roofs of their cliff houses carved in the rocks below. Guzelyurt has been declared a conservation area requiring new buildings to be constructed of natural stone so as to maintain its distinct Cappadocian architecture. The boxy, stone buildings with flat roofs and large arched doorways are more similar to houses of Northern Syria and Upper Mesopotamia than to structures in other parts of Turkey. This is hardly surprising because the earliest mention of Cappadocians by Herodotus in the 5th century BC refers to them as 'Syrians.'

The Melendiz River finds its source in the numerous springs of the Melendiz Daglari and the adjacent Hasan Dagi to its west. These mountains comprise a series of currently inactive volcanoes that, over millions of years, deposited a thick layer (1500 feet) of volcanic lava, ash and mud. This material hardened to form a soft volcanic rock known as tufa which was overlaid with a thinner layer of hard basalt. With the passing of time, the Melendiz River has carved a steep sided gorge on its way toward the marshes of Toz Golu (Salt Lake) leaving behind expanses of flat, basalt topped plateaus that characterize this region. Further erosion of the basalt layer expresses itself in the surrealistic landscape of Cappadocia but in the Ihlara Valley (Peristrema), rock cones are only seen near Yaprakhisar and Selime.

Throughout the years, this verdant valley has remained relatively untouched by the tides of invaders that have swept the land. Sheltered by a natural barrier, the massive Hasan Dagi to the south, the valley is located away from the major travel routes that are still evidenced by the main roads from Aksaray to Kayseri and Kirsehir to Nigde. It has therefore served as a physical and an intellectual oasis for the people who have lived here. Hittites found refuge from the Phrygian invaders while early Christian monks sought its isolation in a remote corner of the kingdom during the 2nd century Roman persecutions and were later sheltered from the Arab invasions in the 7th and 8th centuries.

The valley became an important center of monasticism that lasted from the 4th to the 14th centuries. There are an estimated 150 churches and several monasteries in the canyon between the villages of Ihlara and Selime. A walk through the tranquil 14 km gorge is a delight. The dappled light under poplars and wild olive trees as well as the constant murmur of the water provide relief from an unrelenting sun and the monotony of endless wheat fields that make up the Cappadocian landscape. Near villages, the river continues to be the focus of village life: women wash their laundry amid chatter and laughter, children splash nearby and shepherds bring their animals for a drink.

The main churches are marked although a few have been closed to the public. The most popular churches are those in the canyon area between the villages of Belisirma and Ihlara. However, Yaprakhisar and Selime are more interesting architecturally with stone houses that extend into the rock caves. The village of Selime is named after the sultan whose conical tomb stands on the river's bank and numerous facades are carved into the cliffs at Yaprakhisar. For the adventurous, the entire length of the Ihlara Valley is a wonderful place for exploration. The children know the hidden entryways and they offer some of the most incredible 'tours' to be found in Cappadocia as they share their extraordinary playground, scampering up tracks through the rocks to a labyrinth of caves and tunnels that open to unexpected hideaways.

Only nine miles from Ihlara, the village of Helvadere sits among the foothills of Hasan Dagi. Its peaks are both over 10,000 feet high and its northern face is threaded with ribbons of snow where ravines have etched the mighty volcano. The mountain beckons for it abounds in secrets and legends. It has witnessed the comings and goings of Central Anatolia since the dawn of civilization. Roman ruins, Byzantine churches and Seljuk graves lay scattered along its northern slopes and mountain villagers tell tales of intriguing snake legends. In his book, Caves of God: Cappadocia and Its Churches, Spiro Kostof interprets the symbolism of the paintings in the Yilani Kilise (Snake Church) located across the bridge from the Tourist Pavilion in the Ihlara gorge. For one painting, he suggests that a woman is being punished for not nursing her children because 2 snakes are attached to her nipples. It seems likely that the real meaning may be hidden within the snake legends of these mountain people. While we long to uncover the secrets of Hasan Dagi, there is only enough time for a half an hour hike behind Helvadere to visit the ruins of Viransehir (Destroyed City). There was a large monastic complex here and remnants of a Byzantine fortress and two churches can be seen.

A drive through the region to the north of the Aksaray-Nevsehir road is to visit the true heart of Turkey. Numerous farming communities are located along the streams and rivers that empty into the stalwart Kizilirmak, Turkey's longest river that is over 800 miles in length. Farming in Turkey is generally highly mechanized, but here, reapers still wield the scythe and plants are sometimes hand-watered with scoops dipped into nearby irrigation canals. When the sun reaches its zenith, workers gather under shade trees for their midday meal and a well earned rest in a scene reminiscent of Bruegel's 16th century painting, "The Harvesters." This centuries old way of life continues, seemingly indifferent to the encroachment of mass tourism.

There are cavetowns and rock formations scattered within this area. Tatlarinkoy boasts an extensive semi-troglodytic complex but only a few caves are available to the public. The small Byzantine church has not been vandalized and its original colors remain rich and vibrant. A typical cave dwelling with several rooms can be explored and it is complete with 'telephone' (a special chute for talking to those on another level), toilet, kitchen, shelves and a large, solid, wheel-shaped rock that serves as a rolling door. Above the doorway is a compartment from which to attack an intruder who may have broken through the barrier. The main features of this cave dwelling are duplicated throughout Cappadocia. In Tatlarinkoy, cave entrances speckle the surrounding cliffs carved by the Acisu River. Some caves are used by farmers for food storage and animal shelters but many seem to have been completely abandoned.

Kayseri was already an ancient Hittite settlement called Mazaca when it was renamed Caesarea of Cappadocia by the Romans in the 1st century AD. Nearby, archaeological excavations at Kultepe have revealed that the area was first occupied around 4000 BC and known as Kanesh in ancient times. It was a powerful commercial trade and mining center around 2000 BC and 4000 year old Assyrian silver mines can still be seen there. Most of the artifacts from Kultepe are housed in the Archaeological Museum in Kayseri.

During Byzantine times, Caesarea Mazaca maintained its prominence as a city of commerce and trade as well as a major metallurgical center that specialized in the manufacture of heavy cavalry armor. Its schools were ranked with those of Athens, Alexandria and Constantinople. It must have been an affluent city because historical references have been made to its beautiful homes, elegant cuisine and the many almshouses that were built by St. Basil the Great, another Cappadocian Father and friend of St. Gregory Nazianzus. Much of its Byzantine years has been lost because the city was razed in the 11th century when it was captured by the Seljuk Turks and it lay abandoned for fifty years. Ruins of a 4th century monastery and Justinian's 6th century citadel that has been extensively renovated by the Seljuk and Ottoman Turks, still remain. Surprisingly, one of Caesarea Mazaca's culinary traditions has survived. They developed a type of cured beef called paston which was introduced to Hungary and Romania as pastirma by the conquering Turks. It was then adapted and carried to New York as pastrami by Jewish immigrants.

Under the Seljuks, Kayseri became prominent once again as the second most important city in the empire with many architecturally important structures. Theological schools, a medical school and hospitals were built here. As an important center of learning and commerce, Kayseri attracted an intellectual elite, merchants, tradesmen and skilled artisans. Today, Kayseri is a university town, a major agricultural center and enjoys a bustling trade in carpets and kilims.

Birds of the Reed Forests
To the south of Kayseri and Erciyes Dagi, the Sultansazligi or the Sultan Marshes is an extensive wetland area that envelops the Develi Plain. The road from Kayseri to the town of Develi affords a very scenic drive following the Karasu River to Tekir Yaylasi where a popular ski center is located on the eastern slopes of Erciyes Dagi. The road then descends the southern slopes of the mountain where the entire Sultan Marshes ecosystem spreads itself beneath the majestic, snow-capped mountain. On closer view, reeds sway to gentle breezes, iridescent blue waters shimmer in the sunlight and masses of pink flamingoes cavort in Yay Golu.

This wetland area consists of two reed-covered freshwater lakes, Egrigol and Col Golu, to the north and south of the Develi Plain, Yay Golu, a saltwater lake between them as well as the surrounding marshlands. It is the largest wetland ecosystem in Turkey and is fed by numerous springs and streams from the surrounding mountains. Its location at the juncture of three continents makes it an important breeding ground for birds and over 250 species are found here. While the Sultan Marshes are of special interest to ornithologists, the pink flamingoes of Yay Golu are as impressive to most travelers as those on Lake Nakuru in Kenya or Lake Manyara in Tanzania.

There is a lookout tower at Ovaciftlik just east of the Kayseri-Nigde highway along the connecting road to Yahyali, a village where local women weave distinctive patterned carpets of world renown. The villages of Sindelhuyuk near Develi and Ovaciftlik are convenient for making arrangements to view the flamingoes of Yay Golu but boat rides on the various lakes can generally be negotiated from any of the villages that surround the area.

Underground Cities
Although referred to as "cities," the underground communities of Cappadocia probably served as temporary shelters rather than as permanent hidden cities. The incessant darkness is hardly conducive to life and some of the passageways are little more than crawling spaces that would have been intolerable in long-term situations. No one is certain as to the number of underground communities that exist or even by whom they were built.

The two largest communities that have been unearthed are located at Kaymakli and Derinkuyu, 20 and 30 kms. south of Nevsehir on the Nevsehir-Nigde road. It is thought that the Hittites may have excavated the first few levels in the rock when they came under attack from the Phrygians around 1200 BC. However, some archaeologists believe that the oldest caves, those hewn with stone rather than metal tools, are substantially older. These chambers were later expanded into an extensive troglodytic complex by Christians escaping the Arab invasions of the 7th and 8th centuries.

Discreet entrances give way to elaborate subterranean systems with air shafts, waste shafts, wells, chimneys and connecting passageways. The upper levels were used for living quarters while the lower levels were used for storage, wine making, flour grinding and worship in simple chapels. Everywhere, walls have been blackened from the use of torches. There is a connecting tunnel between Kaymakli and Derinkuyu that allowed three people to walk through at the same time but it is not available to the public as parts of the tunnel have collapsed.

0nly 10 kms. to the east of Kaymakli is another cavetown at Mazikoy that may be connected with Derinkuyu but this remains to be proven. This community was built within the walls of a cliff. Unlike Kaymakli and Derinkuyu, there are no stairs or grades that pass from one level to the next. Instead, the different levels are well defined with connecting tunnels through which people climbed up or let themselves down by means of footholds carved into the walls of the shafts. Mazikoy is often bypassed because it is a smaller community, its location is away from the main road and a certain agility is required to fully appreciate its features.

Rock Cut Churches and Monasteries
Many settlements in Cappadocia were established primarily as monastic communities. As Bishop of Caesarea Mazaca in the 4th century, St. Basil the Great wrote the rules for monastic life that are still followed by monks and nuns of the Greek Orthodox Church. He advocated community life, prayer and physical labor rather than the solitary asceticism that was popular at the time and it was under his guidance that the first churches were built in Goreme Valley. Here, a number of small communities with their own churches formed the large monastic complex that is now the Open Air Museum. Hundreds of churches are reported to have been built in this valley but no churches from St. Basil's time remain. In Goreme, the Tokali Kilise or the "Buckle Church" is easily the loveliest of the churches with graceful arches and beautiful frescoes.

The most impressive monastery in Cappadocia is the Eskigumus Monastery to the east of Nigde off the Kayseri-Nigde road. It is the most southerly of the Cappadocian monasteries and lies close to the route taken by the invading Arabs who traversed the Tarsus Mountains from the south to plunder Kayseri in the 7th century. This route follows the Tarsus River through a precipitous defile called the Gulek Bogazi. It was known in the ancient world as the Cicilian Gates and was used by Alexander the Great in his eastward campaign against the Persians. The nondescript entrance to the Eskigumus Monastery was designed to shield the monastery complex from invaders passing by. It was so successful that the monastery was not discovered until 1963, having escaped the vandalism to which many of the Cappadocian churches and monasteries were subjected. The large inner courtyard boasts high walls surrounded by monastic rooms and storage chambers. The main church is spacious and airy and its well-preserved frescoes are considered to be the best example of Byzantine art in all of Cappadocia.

Pigeon Houses
Near Uchisar is a valley that has become quite popular with hikers. It is known by many names (Valley of the Pigeon Lofts, Dovecote Valley, Pigeon Valley) but they all refer to the thousands of pigeon houses that have been carved into the soft tufa since ancient times. Although they can be found throughout Cappadocia, they are especially plentiful in this valley which must have one of the greatest collections of pigeon lofts in the world. They were carved wherever space allowed including abandoned caves and the walls of collapsed churches. They lack the architectural interest of the doocots of Scotland or the elaborate Persian pigeon towers but their sheer numbers are astonishing. In Cappadocia, pigeons have long been a source of food and fertilizer. The advent of chemical fertilizers has reduced the use of pigeon fertilizer. However, some farmers still maintain their lofts because they insist that the reputation of Cappadocian fruits as the sweetest and most succulent in Turkey is entirely due to the pigeons' droppings.

Best Times to Go:
Cappadocia is generally cooler than the popular coastal areas of the Mediterranean and the Aegean. April to mid June and September to October are the best months for avoiding the intense heat and crowds of summer.

Getting There:
Turkey has excellent bus and dolmus (minibus) service. Bus service to Cappadocia is available from Istanbul, Ankara, and the major cities of Turkey. Drop off points differ according to the city of origin so take a bus from wherever you are to whatever destination in Cappadocia is available then use a taxi or the dolmus service to get to the towns that you may want to visit.

Travel agents in major cities in Turkey all offer tours to Cappadocia. If time is an issue and you have no other options for visiting the area, it is better to take the tour rather than to forgo the region but be aware of the limitations of such tours which have a propensity for spending too much time at the carpet shops.

The main airport of the region is located in Kayseri and there are regular flights from Istanbul by Turkish Airlines (THY). Buses are available from Erkilet airport to the otogar in Kayseri. Argeus Tours (Tel. 90-384-214-2800) has a shuttle service from the Airport to Goreme and Urgup.

Clothing/Gear:
Modest, season appropriate clothes are suggested for visits to Cappadocia. Immodest clothing for women (shorts, short skirts, tank tops, tight fitting clothes) still invites unwanted attention in this conservative region, especially in the less visited villages. Long pants are recommended for those who want to explore cave dwellings as some crawling may be necessary and the tufa surfaces can be quite rough. Be sure to bring a wide brimmed hat, sun tan lotion, and comfortable shoes.

When traveling in Turkey, it is a good idea for women to bring a long skirt, light sweater and pretty shawl. They can quickly be slipped on over casual clothes to dress up for dinner or to become appropriately dressed when visiting the mosques.

General Information:
Those who plan to visit other areas of Turkey should consider flying since distances are so great between the different areas of interest. Bus travel within Turkey is easy and inexpensive. Smoking is prohibited but this is not always the reality, especially on long trips.

It is easy to get around the main areas of Cappadocia by dolmus service which is inexpensive and offers regularly scheduled trips. However, service to the less traveled areas is sporadic and not always convenient. A variety of one day tours are offered by numerous local tour companies at a cost of about $75 - $100 per person per day. It is better to rent your own vehicle or to hire a car and driver. A rental car costs $60 - $100 per day and hiring a car and driver costs about $75 - $125 per day. Putting together a small group will make this option more cost effective. Avis has an office in Urgup (tel. 90-384-341-2177) while local car rental companies or a car and driver may be found by asking at your hotel.

The excellent hotel rates of the Aegean coastline do not extend to Cappadocia where modern, western style hotels exist but are substantially more expensive. Fortunately, there is a good selection of reasonably priced pensions and small hotels, some of which provide unique lodgings such as cave dwellings and converted monasteries. Restaurants are plentiful and if you cannot read the menu, you are welcome to peer into the pots to make your selection.

Planning Tips:

  • Allocate more than two or three days to experience this truly unique area.
  • Do include Konya in your Cappadocian itinerary. It was the once known as Iconium under the Romans and later became the capital of the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum. The best examples of Seljuk architecture and calligraphy can be seen here.
  • The culture of rural Turkey is conservative so modesty and polite manners are always appreciated.
  • Be sure to keep yourself hydrated and to pace yourself in the summertime as the heat can be quite fierce.
  • Try to vary your activities. Unless you are a Byzantine specialist, visiting the 50th rock cut church on the same day becomes a blur.
  • It is worthwhile to explore the area around Guzelyurt. Particularly interesting is the nearby Kizil Kilise (Red Church), a 6th century cruciform church with a dome that sits on top of an unusual, octagonal structure. This graceful, little church was constructed from red trachyte, a type of volcanic rock.
  • Do visit the rock fortress of Ortahisar, the spectacular Devrent Valley, the lush Soganli Valley and other well known sites. These areas have not been mentioned only because substantial information is already provided in most guidebooks.
  • Purchase a good road map prior to leaving home. They are difficult to find in Turkey, especially outside the main cities.

Important Resources:

  • Alternatif Outdoor
    Kenan Evren Bulvari, Camlik sok. 10/1
    48700 Marmaris-Mugla-TURKEY
    Tel: 90-252-417-2720
    Fax: 90-252-417-3952
    Email: info@alternatifraft.com

    Alternatif Outdoor can arrange treks to Erciyes Dagi and Hasan Dagi as well as the nearby Ala Daglari. These mountains are especially beautiful in springtime with wildflowers and some snow cover. Alternatif Outdoor also makes arrangements for horse riding, hot air ballooning and other customized tours of Cappadocia.

    Alternatif Outdoor specializes in rafting and kayaking trips as well as other outdoor activities in Southwest Turkey amd Cappadocia. It is the longest established and most experienced outdoor activity company in Turkey. The owners have many years’ experience as professional river and outdoor guides, and their active involvement in the business includes frequent guiding. As a result they take a personal interest in each tour, ensuring that the quality of service and attention to detail remains high.

Related Books:

  • Cappadocia
  • is published by Casa Editrice Bonechi and is available at souvenir shops throughout Cappadocia. It has numerous photographs and descriptions of the main churches and villages of Cappadocia as well as a general map of the area.
  • Churches of the Ihlara Valley
  • is a guide that can be found at the Tourist Pavilion along the road between Belisirma and Ihlara villages. It not only describes the churches but also provides a very helpful map.
  • Turkey: The Rough Guide
  • by Rosie Ayliffe, Marc Dubin and John Gawthrop is an excellent guide to Cappadocia and to Turkey in general with a good balance of factual and practical information.
  • Turkey: A Lonely Planet Travel Survival Kit
  • by Tom Brosnahan and Pat Yale has a good selection of accommodations available in Cappadocia and has been recently revised. It is a reliable general guide to Turkey and Tom welcomes readers' questions and suggestions. His email address is published for easy access.
  • Trekking in Turkey
  • by Marc Dubin and Enver Lucas is a Lonely Planet publication that describes many of the hiking routes in Turkey including a day hike through the Ihlara Valley and treks to the peaks of Hasan Dagi and Erciyes Dagi.
  • Turkey Travel Atlas
  • by Lonely Planet is a much welcomed publication featuring detailed road maps by section as well as walking tracks within each area. Unfortunately, there is no full, fold-out map to give a relative perspective.
  • Baedeker's Turkey
  • has comprehensive information about the Byzantine churches of Cappadocia. The accompanying country map is readily available and is one of the better maps with major footpaths and locations of many of the smaller villages.
  • A Byzantine Journey
  • by John Ash is a richly detailed portrayal of the Byzantine Empire with a fascinating section on Cappadocia.